Indonesia

Indonesia

17,504

Islands

Different Ethnic Groups

Official Religions

UNESCO heritage sites

Indonesia: An Overview

The Republic of Indonesia is located in South-East Asia, a member of ASEAN and the G20. Indonesia’s Human Development Index (HDI) score is consistently increasing each year, and for 2018 reaches 71.39 (https://www.bps.go.id/galeri#).

The official language is Bahasa Indonesia, but there are over 650 local languages spoken (https://tirto.id/jumlah-bahasa-daerah-di-indonesia-mencapai-652-pada-2018-cSQY). With 270 million people, it is the 4th most populous nation in the world (https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/).

The Indonesian archipelago contributes to its biodiversity and diverse society (https://www.britannica.com/place/Indonesia). With the many volcanoes the land grows rich crops, although making it vulnerable to seismic activity.

Indonesia is a unitary state with the principle of broad regional autonomy. Administrative regions within Indonesia are currently divided into 34 provinces (https://indonesia.go.id/).

Indonesia has 17,504 islands, where 16,056 have been recognized by the UN (http://www.big.go.id/berita-surta/show/rujukan-nasional-data-kewilayahan-luas-nkri-8-3-juta-kilometer-persegi)

Indonesia consists of 1,340 ethnic groups, based on Statistics Indonesia report in 2010 (https://indonesia.go.id/profil/suku-bangsa)

The Government of Indonesia recognizes six official religions; Islam, Protestant Christianity, Catholic Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. However, there are people who practice local beliefs that are unrecognized by the government; the 2010 population census finds the number is 299.617 people or 0,13 percent of the total population (https://sp2010.bps.go.id/index.php/site/tabel?tid=321)

Around 87.2% of Indonesian population professes Islam (more than 207 million), making the most populous Muslim-majority country in the world (https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/countries-with-the-largest-muslim-populations.html).

Indonesia is home to 8 UNESCO world heritage sites, including the Borobudur Temple, Komodo National Park and Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra (https://whatsnewindonesia.com/get-to-know-8-unesco-world-heritage-sites-in-indonesia/

Our work in Indonesia

Children who had read the comic books and joined in educational activities using the coming books expressed
the benefit of the comic books in making them:

”be more confident”
”no longer feel ashamed when asked to share my experience”
”know about medicinal plants such as guava to teat dengue fever, that are useful fo our health, as alternative
from hospital drugs.”

From: Final Evaluation Report, “Perjalanan Mencari Sahabat” Comic Book Program in Poso – Central Sulawesi (ARTI & SFCGI, 2006)

The MAP team first began working together in Indonesia in 2006 through the project “Promoting Tolerance and Dialogue through Interactive Theatre in Eastern Indonesia”. A separate project running from 2004-6,  ‘Program for Promoting Peace Building Activities Targeting Young Generations in Poso, Central Sulawesi – Indonesia’, was also undertaken by members of the team. An overview of both programmes is provided below.

Program for Promoting Peace Building Activities Targeting Young Generations in Poso, Central Sulawesi – Indonesia (2004-2006).

The program was managed by Yayasan ARTI and Search for Common Ground Indonesia (SFCGI), with the support from the People of Japan and USAID. The program activities were implemented by local partners in Poso District, Central Sulawesi. The rationale for the program was that following the horizontal conflict in the district and relocation of communities, it was found that remaining books left in schools were scarce or half-burnt. Since there were almost no media targeted on children in the district, the use of media as peace building tool, especially comics, would have positive impact. Based on these considerations, a peace education program utilizing unique comic series based on proven methodology was designed and implemented in Poso to reach a wide children audience with messages of tolerance and practical methods of resolving conflict. Result of final monitoring and evaluation showed that in general, knowledge of direct beneficiaries about concepts on conflict transformation and peace education especially the concept about balance of ecology, social justice, human rights, non-violence, and conflict has increased after participating in the various educational activities. Attitudes of direct beneficiaries toward conflict transformation and peace education has also changed positively after participating in educational activities. Knowledge of the educational facilitators (community facilitators and school teachers) about main concepts of peace building was clearly higher after participating in capacity building workshops. Children who had read the comic books and joined in educational activities using the coming books expressed the benefit of the comic books in making them:

”(I) no longer feel ashamed when asked to share my experience”

”(I) learn about medicinal plants such as guava to treat dengue fever, that are useful for our health, as an alternative for hospital drugs.”

Also, children who read the comic books, but did not join the educational activities also expressed their understanding of the messages in the comic books:

“helping one another as human beings show how they apply love towards other human beings”

“helping one another who are in need although they are of different religion”

From: Final Evaluation Report, “Perjalanan Mencari Sahabat” Comic Book Program in Poso – Central Sulawesi (ARTI & SFCGI, 2006).

Promoting Tolerance and Dialogue through Interactive Theatre in Eastern Indonesia.

Overview

The Promoting Tolerance and Dialogue through Interactive Theatre in Eastern Indonesia project was designed to bring youth from conflict and post-conflict areas into productive dialogue through an innovative use of theatre, and to build local capacity for ongoing work in conflict prevention and mitigation. IREX Europe worked with an Indonesian counterpart, the Center for Civic Education-Indonesia (CCEI), to implement the project, which is funded by the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office’s Strategic Programme Fund.

Background

The project aimed at improving tolerance and countering radicalization by targeting its root causes, primarily the extremist dialogue that is leading youth in areas such as Eastern Indonesia toward violence and radicalism. This one-year program introduced a powerful method for helping young people to address and work through conflict, combining theatre, debate and reflection to create a “safe space” for exploring incendiary issues. This approach draws on Brazilian director Augusto Boal’s methodology, which has been used successfully around the world.

Two Theatre Exploration Camps drew young participants, ages 14-16, from four areas of Eastern Indonesia that had experienced significant conflict: Ambon, Lombok, Pasuruan, and Poso in Central Sulawesi. Approximately 100 in-school and out-of-school youth and teachers attended each 18-day camp, facilitated by specialists in interactive theatre methodology. A key component of the project was building local capacity in interactive theatre methodology by including training for teachers and local theatre professionals. Micro-grants were available to the teachers and theatre professionals to conduct follow-on interactive theatre initiatives after the camps.

Project Activities

  • Training local theatre professionals and teachers to use interactive theatre techniques for conflict prevention and mitigation, enabling them to address conflict drivers with young people in their home regions and combat the voices of extremism and intolerance.
  • Conducting camps for young Indonesians in East Java to engage them in interactive theatre and dialogue, with facilitation by specialists in theatre as a conflict mitigation tool. Through interactive plays they develop, youth will have a “safe space” to explore conflict triggers, address differences, and build tolerance of diversity.
  • Supporting theatre professionals and teachers to implement interactive theatre activities in their home communities and schools to build tolerance and respect for diversity, and to prevent and mitigate conflict.

The Indonesian strand of MAP will build on these projects, integrating it into the wider MAP programme and methodological structure whilst tailoring the MAP tools to the unique Indonesian context.

 

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Our Network in Indonesia